culture, traditions and social justice 
reblogged 3 hours ago with 126,308 notesviasource

sockseevil:

katwaterflame:

josiephone:

Apparently some vegans are telling people not to eat honey to support bees.

STOP. STOP NOW.
DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?

Buy honey (local if possible) -> support beekeepers -> support bees.

I swear people don’t even think this stuff out. 
Beekeepers provide bees with an environment in which they can live, and are encouraged to thrive. Bees then have a big huge giant person who can deal with any threats to the hive. 
Yes, honey is a winter food supply for bees, but beekeepers (unless they’re dicks, in which case they’d be shooting themselves in the foot) will NEVER take too much honey from a hive, and will always ensure that bees have enough food. Think about it, you’re not going to starve a source of income/hobby, are you?

So now.
Support beekeepers.
Support bees.

buzz.

I had to reblog just for “DO YOU EVEN KNOW HOW BEES WORK?" because it made me realize that some people really don’t!

Erm excuse you

That is not how it happened in bee movie

reblogged 15 hours ago with 321 notesviasource

dhrupad:

Purab Aur Paschim पूरब और पशचिम (1970)

reblogged 15 hours ago with 2,458 notesviasource

virakul:

inonibird:

Stick-Gods ~ The Power of Ra

oh gods

reblogged 15 hours ago with 106 notesviasource

beautiesofafrique:

Ovimbundu woman, Angola

reblogged 15 hours ago with 31 notesviasource

beautiesofafrique:

ohkevina:


Amy Tshibangu

Congolese

reblogged 15 hours ago with 169 notesviasource

beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: The Amhara people of Ethiopia

The name Amhara means pleasing, agreeable, beautiful, and gracious.

 The Amhara are one of the two largest ethnolinguistic groups in Ethiopia (the other group being the Oromo). They constitute almost one-third of the country’s population. The Amharic language is an Afro-Asiatic language belonging to the Southwest Semitic group. It is related to Geʿez, the sacred literary language of the Ethiopian Orthodox church, an ancient religion preserved virtually intact from the Monophysite Christianity of the Byzantine church of the 5th century. The Amhara, along with the Tigray peoples, are the principal adherents of this church.

The Amhara long dominated the history of their country; Amharic was the official language of Ethiopia until the 1990s, and it remains important. As descendants of a southward movement of ancient Semitic conquerors who mingled with indigenous Cushitic peoples, they inhabit much of the central and western parts of present-day Ethiopia. All except one of the country’s emperors from 1270 to 1974 were Amhara; this dominance created competitive quarrels between the Amhara and their northern neighbours, the Tigray, and other Ethiopian ethnic groups, such as the Oromo. Tensions rose between the Amhara and the Oromo during the period of socialist rule (1974–91), as the Oromo claimed an increasingly prominent role in the nation’s social and political affairs. After 1991 a measure of Amhara sentiment was directed against the Tigray, who had gained influence during the struggle against the Marxists.

The Amhara are primarily agriculturists, producing corn (maize), wheat, barley, sorghum, and teff (Eragrostis abyssinica), a cereal grass that is grown for its grain and is a staple of the region. Traditionally, Amhara social structure was dominated by strong personalized ties between patrons and clients, superiors and inferiors. Generally, a man’s importance was in direct proportion to the amount of land he owned. A man of wealth who owned no land, such as a merchant, had little influence. Under the imperial system, land was granted to titled nobles in return for military service to the emperor. The land was farmed by tenant clients.

Descent is reckoned patrilineally, and married couples usually reside near the husband’s home. The Amhara practice three types of marriage: kal kidan, qurban, and damoz. Kal kidan (also called serat or semanya [“eighty”]) is marriage by civil contract. It is by far the most common form, though a great percentage of such unions end in divorce. Qurban marriages are performed in church and are regarded as sacred; they cannot be dissolved, even after the death of one partner, except in extraordinary circumstances. Because of these restrictions, it is the least common form of marital union; most couples choosing to celebrate the rite are already long married under kal kidan and have children. Qurban also is the only type of wedlock into which Ethiopian Orthodox priests may enter. First marriages of the kal kidan or qurban types are normally arranged by the parents. The third type of marriage—that with the lowest status—is damoz, an arrangement by which the woman is paid to be a temporary wife, most often for a period of one or two months. While the woman in a damoz relationship receives no claim to the estate of her transient husband, children born under such unions are considered legitimate. Damoz unions were outlawed from the mid-20th century, but they continued in practice.

Read more/Sources:: 1| 2

reblogged 15 hours ago with 133 notesviasource
reblogged 15 hours ago with 2,170 notesviasource

yearsoflivingdangerously:

This comic was produced in partnership by Years of Living Dangerously and Symbolia Magazine. For more amazing real life comics, get Symbolia on your iPad or via PDF. And for more information on the biggest story of our time - check out YEARS.

reblogged 15 hours ago with 25 notesviasource
posted 15 hours ago with 2 notes

Beautiful Afro Antillano Panamanian girl