culture, traditions and social justice 
answered 1 week ago with 0 notes

Can I ask you to delete my photo works from your page which were stollen from my facebook page. All copyrights recerved. tx

Anonymous

hey anon, i believe it would be a little helpful to know which picture you’re talking about thx

posted 1 week ago with 6 notes

Brunei cloth weaving

Above are a few examples of traditional cloth weaving in Brunei. The earliest recorded mention can be traced back to Sultan Bolkiah’s reign from 1485 to 1524. One of the most well-known designs is the Jongsarat pattern. It is said to be the design above all others, reflecting the skill, artistic beauty and fine workmanship in which a quality cloth possesses. There are many other designs such as the Kain Bertabur, Sipugut, Sukmaindera, Silubang Bangsi and Arab Gagati. For more information about this tradition head over to thebrunei resources site
reblogged 1 week ago with 57 notesviasource

pamandjapan:

物の怪 (Mononoke)

A Mononoke is synonymous to a yokai. It literally means the “spirit of a thing” but it is a word used to describe ghosts, monsters, or spirits. It can also be used to describe any mischievous and troublesome creature/entity of uncertain origin.

reblogged 1 week ago with 576,497 notesviasource

crabbyjammies:

gymnosofi:

mypatientvessel:

Dude.

My dad was telling me about these girls at his old college who invented a nail polish that paints on clear, and if you stir your drink with your finger with the nail polish on, it will react with the “Date Rape” drug and turn red.

Dude. It’s genius.

http://www.2lovemylips.co.uk/

I saw this before and didn’t reblog it because it didn’t have anything to say how but now that there is a link saying how I wil reblog it.

reblogged 1 week ago with 300 notesviasource

trilliansmut:

haiweewicci:

progressivefriends:

moreleftthannot:

William Lynch

This president takes more disrespect than any other president in my lifetime. Even Richard Nixon in his last months in office was treated with more respect. Personally, I am disgusted with the dismal behavior of many of my fellow citizens. If you don’t like the occupant of the oval office, you should have good reasons and you should have a well structured logical argument as to why you don’t like him. In no event, should you ever disrespect the office holder. We are just not seeing this in the case of President Obama and that is wrong!

Drones. Killing American citizens abroad without a trial. More pot arrests than any president in history. Backing Israel. Letting Detroit rot. Only becoming pro-lgbt after we made progress without him. Not doing a damn thing about Guantanamo. Not allowing the single-payer people in on the meetings during the negotiations of the Affordable Care Act… How many reasons do I need? Because I can fucking list them.

Visits Standing Rock Rez and promises to renew the country’s relationship with Native Americans. Two weeks later gives the green light to steal more tribal land.

I want to show this to people who hate “Bama”. Because 90% of the people I know who hate him, dislike him because “he’s going to steal our guns that damn communist!” like……. come on. there are real reasons to dislike him and that’s what you’re going with???

posted 1 week ago with 1 note

Turkana, Kenya X

reblogged 1 week ago with 494 notesviasource

thepeoplesrecord:

The overwhelming silence of Gaza’s streets
July 14, 2014

Mahmoud Darwish, the great Palestinian poet, once called Gaza “an incomparable moral treasure for Arabs.” No matter what our enemies do, Gaza will “not repeat lies and say ‘yes’ to invaders,” he wrote.

Here is the truth about what our Israeli invaders have done to us in recent days. They havekilled more than 170 people. More than thirty of them are children.

They have injured more than one thousand. Most of our victims are civilians.

Everyone in Gaza is a potential target for Israel’s warplanes. We can all be killed — whether we stay at home, go to work, go to a marketplace or pray in a mosque.

No ambition for martyrdom

In Gaza, we call our victims “martyrs,” whether they intended to die or not. Some people in the West find this puzzling. We make no apology for doing so. We have always believed that those who are killed by the Israeli occupation will be rewarded by God in paradise.

I have not been trying to become a martyr. I am a journalist trying to do my job.

Last week, I was trying to ensure that the voices of Gaza are heard in the outside world, something I do all the time.

While I was taking a taxi home after conducting some interviews, I narrowly missed an Israeli drone attack on a motorcycle. Two martyrs died instantly in that attack.

Protecting my children is not easy.

Each day I go to a market near where I live, so that I can buy some food for my family. Munir, my fifteen-year-old son, accompanied me on one of these recent visits. We had to race home. Munir started running first, as we heard the thunderous roar of an Israeli airstrike. I felt compelled to run, too.

When we got back home, I started thinking about what could have happened. What if the Israelis had bombed us?

Too much suffering

Too many people have already lost loved ones. Too many families are suffering.

Muhammad Hamad’s wife, three of his sons and his sixteen-year-old granddaughter were all killed in a bomb attack on Beit Hanoun in northern Gaza.

Eighteen people were wiped out when Israel hit a house and mosque in the Tuffah neighborhood of Gaza City.

Mohammed Khalaf Awad al-Nawasara was just two years old. His brother, Nidal, was four. They were among a family of four killed when Israel bombed al-Meghazi refugee camp in central Gaza.

Risking their lives

Ambulance drivers are risking their lives to bring victims to hospitals. At least two ambulance crew members have been wounded in eastern Gaza City. There are few other vehicles on the road.

It is Ramadan. Usually during this blessed month, we hear vendors calling out to us from their market stalls. They plead with us to buy treats for the iftar, the meal that ends a day of fasting.

Over the past few days, the marketplaces have been silent.

The silence is overwhelming. People on the street look as if they are attending a funeral, as if they are about to bury their dead. Many faces look pale.

This is the third time in less than six years that Israel has subjected us to an all-out attack.

We are traumatized. We are terrorized.

But we are still here. All 1.8 million of us.

Mahmoud Darwish was right. We will never say “yes” to our invaders. They will never defeat us.

Source
Photo 12, 3, 4 

reblogged 1 week ago with 1,109 notesviasource

hiromisshi:

Un bon 14 Juillet à toutes les Françaises, tous les Français et mêmes aux Francophiles! Happy Bastille’s Day to all the French and Francophiles! :) 

Remember that Bastille’s Day commemorates the break of the prison La Bastille by the French revolutionaries and celebrates the anniversary of the French Revolution. :) 

reblogged 1 week ago with 292 notesviasource

Mehndi is a Hindu symbolic representation of the outer and the inner sun. Hinduism customs are centered around the notion of “awakening the inner light/soul.” These Hindu designs originated in ancient India in 3500BC as a Hindu art form, and was adopted by the Middle East where they call it Henna. 

reblogged 1 week ago with 3,300 notesviasource

somepalestiniankid:

Also since we’re here, I’m all for denouncing Zionism but can we please avoid the antisemitism

Israel =/= Jews
Jews =/= pro-Israel

This includes sending threatening messages to Jews, posting cartoons with blood libel, posting cartoons portraying Jews as antisemitic caricatures, associating Nazism with Israel or intertwining swastikas with Star of Davids.

That is all, have a nice day